Citizenship: concession codes and fee payment

The new Regulations ‘allow citizenship application fees … and refunds … to be paid in foreign currencies and in foreign countries, and [align] the concession codes in Schedule 3 with the concession codes currently employed by the Department of Human Services’

The explanatory statement to the new Australian Citizenship Amendment (Concession Codes and Payment of Fees) Regulations 2019 includes the following passages:

Part 1 of Schedule 1 to the Regulations, which relates to updating the concession codes listed in Schedule 3 to the Citizenship Regulation, will commence on 2 March 2019.

Part 2 of Schedule 1 to the Regulations, which relates to the payment of fees in foreign currencies and in foreign countries, will commence on 1 July 2019.

The Australian Citizenship Amendment (Concession Codes and Payment of Fees) Regulations 2019 (the Regulations) amend the Australian Citizenship Regulation 2016 (the Citizenship Regulation) to allow citizenship application fees, and refunds of citizenship application fees where appropriate, to be paid in foreign currencies and in foreign countries, and to align the concession codes in Schedule 3 with the concession codes currently employed by the Department of Human Services (DHS).

In particular, the Regulations amend the Citizenship Regulation to:

  • Update the codes listed in Schedule 3 so that they correspond with the codes appearing on relevant pensioner concession cards issued by DHS.
  • Incorporate, by reference, instruments made under the Migration Regulations 1994 (the Migration Regulations) that relate to the payment of fees in foreign currencies and in foreign countries. The purpose of this amendment is to facilitate the lawful collection of citizenship application fees in specified foreign currencies and foreign countries at updated exchange rates.

Disclaimer: the above is a mere extract of a new piece of legislation. The views there expressed might not reflect the views of the Department, the AAT or the courts. The law or policies might have changed between the writing and reading of this article. The author of this article and Migration Law Updates disclaim any liability for any action (or omission) on their part based on any information provided (or not provided) in this article and are under no obligation to keep the general public nor practitioners informed about the matters discussed in this article or any other matters, or any future changes to any of those matters. It is the responsibility of each practitioner to obtain access to primary sources of law and policy by themselves and to carry out their own research and come to their own conclusions on legislation, case law, policies and more. This article is not intended for the general public.


Sergio Zanotti Stagliorio is a Registered Migration Agent (MARN 1461003). He is the owner of Target Migration in Sydney. He can be reached at sergio@targetmigration.com.au